YWAM England Leadership Appraisal Pack

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Most staff members have joined YWAM because the pursuit of their call makes a valuable contribution to YWAM's overall vision and goals. We want to make sure that together we remain focused on God, that we stimulate growth and development, pursue excellence and help each individual find fulfilment in ministry, thereby encouraging long-term commitment to the vision of the organisation.

In contrast to company employment our tasks and work ethic are rooted in and generated by our belief and value system shared by each individual member. Appraisal therefore is a tool to assist with the development of the whole person, not just to improve job performance. 'As a leader, you must make the development of others a life style. When you live it, your success in life is multiplied exponentially. Your influence is expanded incredibly beyond your personal reach. A positive future is assured for you. Leaders who do not develop people will one day find themselves hitting a wall in their success. No matter how efficient and strategic they are, eventually they run out of time.' (John C. Maxwell, "Developing The Leaders Around You" [1995] p.213) The continuous challenge for a leader in YWAM is balance. There is always far more work than we can hope to accomplish, there are always more problems than solutions, there is always a pull between the urgent and the important. Let's make time to take stock.

As leaders we exert influence, model Godly principles and lead forward into a God-given vision for the future. Therefore we need to demonstrate mature Christian character, combined with sound competence in core leadership skills and a clear calling to a God-given vision.

Our Christian leadership is at its core 'servant' in nature, seeking to emulate Christ in His character. Servant leadership seeks to serve not its own ends but Christ's, and to do so by putting the interests and needs of others before personal desires, and by investing in other people to see them in turn develop their potential through identification with Christ and a life of servanthood.

Appraisal -- What and How?

We will look at our lives and ministries under three aspects:

  • being -- our spiritual life and character
  • doing -- competencies needed for the day-to-day handling of our various roles
  • leaving a legacy[1] -- our investment into those we lead

This separation is, of course, somewhat artificial, but it helps in assessing growth and defining direction and goals.

The appraisal process starts with:

  1. self-assessment, followed by a
  2. review/feedback phase with your accountability partner and your line leader, and results in a
  3. growth plan for personal and ministry development.

Appraisal will be helpful only if it gives us the impetus to stretch and change. In looking at yourself you may feel confronted with shortcomings here and there. Please use those as stepping stones towards fulfilling the Lord's potential in you. They should prompt you to set goals for growth that are measurable and attainable. Defined goals will also help your line leader assist you in your development as progress can be easily monitored.

  1. 'leaving a legacy' is a concept Stephen R. Covey deals with in his excellent book "First Things First"

Leadership Self-Assessment

Before you begin to evaluate, think through your call and God-given vision. How do you see it expressed in your relationships and roles? You may be a spouse or parent, belong to the local tennis club, be a member of your base leadership or be a department leader. Do your roles reflect that you may be called to develop and inspire people into their potential in God, or to research and teach biblical truths, or to evangelise those who have not heard the Gospel? What else might your role reflect?

Spiritual growth and solid Christian character are the underpinning for our roles; in their variety they require varying competencies, and the culmination of any leadership role is the investment into others in order to leave a lasting legacy for God's kingdom.

The Self-assessment paper looks at your

  1. spiritual well-being and development and their impact on those you lead, then asks you
  2. vision and how it is reflected in your ministry
  3. investment into the lives of others. Please take personal notes on separate paper.
  4. competencies required in your various roles. It defines and describes ways in which they are exercised. An easy-to-use grid will help you ascertain where you are at, and will serve to highlight which of these areas need growth and development.

The compentencies grid will also be helpful in your feedback session with your line leader as well as for securing feedback from two or three of your peers.

Spiritual Growth and Leadership

'The success of any organisation will not reach beyond the character of its leaders.' (Maxwell, ibid. p.124)

a) This first section is concerned with your spiritual well-being and development. The enclosed accountability guide can help you examine yourself before the Lord. Please share and pray with your accountability partner(s) and set yourself spiritual growth goals.

These questions are not part of the actual appraisal, but be prepared to talk about your goals with your line-leader where appropriate.

b) Phil 4:9 demonstrates how our spiritual well being and the resulting conduct impact those around us.As you give spiritual leadership to others, please consider your understanding of the following areas. Think of examples and note them down:

  • the aspects of your character you seek to model to others
  • your understanding of spiritual authority and its boundaries
  • your confidence in hearing God for yourself and the ministry and your ability to follow through appropriately
  • your awareness of the overall pastoral condition of those you lead

Having considered these areas what goals might you set for growth? (see Growth Plan page) Leadership

Vision and Ministry

  1. Do you have a clear understanding of your present role(s)?
  2. How well do you think you fulfil the requirements of your current job?
  3. What are your main areas of gifting and how can you use them in your present role(s)?
  4. In what ways are you growing/feeling challenged in your ministry?
  5. How do you see your ministry serve the wider body of YWAM England?
  6. How do you take responsibility for your ongoing development?
  7. What is your call/life goal? Have the past twelve months brought you closer to it? Highlight major stepping stones/stumbling blocks along the way.

Investing Your Life in Others

'The growth and development of people is the highest calling of leadership' (John C. Maxwell, Developing The Leader Within You' [1993], p. 236)

  1. What steps have you taken in the past year to equip and develop at least one person into his/her potential? Describe the process and the result.
  2. What structure do you have in place to encourage and facilitate ongoing development for all your staff?
  3. How do you see yourself in relationship to those you lead? Circle eight words.
    • easily      provoked      assertive      kind      gracious      approachable
    • patient      demanding      preoccupied      persuasive      decisive      faithful
    • directive      critical      open      independent      just
    • supportive      self-controlled      relational
  4. Team Life
    1. How do you ascertain that
      • your team understands the vision of the work and how it translates into organisational goals?
      • each individual knows how and where he/she makes a valuable contribution to the whole?
    2. What are the established channels for feedback and evaluation?
    3. How would you define your contributions and style in the team?
    4. Describe the ways in which you seek to create the openness for staff to express agreement/disagreement. How do you handle conflict in the team?
    5. What staff needs do you have?
    6. How high was your staff turnover last year? For what reasons have staff left?

Core Leadership Competencies

'I believe a leader's success can be defined as the maximum utilisation of the abilities of those under him.' (Maxwell, Developing... p.15) 'Successful leaders recognise their errors, learn from them, and work to correct their faults.' (Maxwell, ibid. p. 68)

This grid enables you to note how you rate your competencies (see example below). There are four ratings available for each competency, a definition has been provided in each case. Read these carefully

(see PDF)

  • Self Confidence
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • People Management
  • Personal Effectiveness
  • Staff Development
  • Analysis & Judgement
  • Opportunity Awareness
  • Planning & Organising
  • Adaptability & Resilience
  • Innovation

before deciding where you would see yourself. You may find yourself halfway in one and halfway in the other section, that's fine. Please mark points in the area of the grid (at the end of this document) that relates to your skill level. This creates an awareness of those areas where further growth is needed.

Self Confidence
  1. Someone who acts on his/her own initiative with respect for authority -- a leader who speaks confidently and assertively. Someone who willingly makes decisions and is accountable for his/her actions.
  2. A leader who can be confident in speech and manner but who can easily be knocked back by circumstances or by words and actions of others. Someone who has the capability but who sometimes finds it difficult to express confidence or give the expression of self-confidence to others.
  3. A leader who sometimes acts assertively but not always. Someone who needs reassurance with regard to decision making and problem solving. Someone who does not always turn ideas into action.
  4. A leader who does not seek opportunities for decision making and change and who would rather rely on dictated rules. Someone who does not speak positively and seems unsure of him/herself. A leader who rarely expresses an opinion or takes action without prompting.
Communication
  1. A leader who speaks and writes clearly, conveying meaning accurately to others. An individual who actively communicates at all levels and routinely takes time to discuss current issues with staff.
  2. A leader who believes communication is important and usually demonstrates this with all staff. An individual who can communicate clearly and concisely, verbally and in writing, but who on occasion does not recognise and act upon every opportunity.
  3. A leader who does not always remember to use positive words and phrases. An individual who only communicates with staff when told to or when a situation has become intolerable.
  4. A leader who does not think before communicating and consequently does it poorly. An individual who always assumes others have the same understanding. A leader who is not skilled in written or verbal communication.
Personal Effectiveness
  1. A leader who takes action, shows initiative, utilises time well and has energy and enthusiasm to complete tasks irrespective of difficulties experienced.
  2. A leader who tries hard to maintain high levels of personal productivity. An individual who demonstrates the use of his/her own initiative in work and the management of others. Someone who tries to maintain high levels of productivity but can be overwhelmed by seemingly impossible problems.
  3. A leader who finds it hard to see activities through to completion either through lack of drive and energy or the inability to overcome setbacks. Someone who relies on direction from the line leader.
  4. Someone who does not maintain high levels of personal productivity, who lacks initiative and does not always produce work of good quality. Someone who does not recognise his/her own problem in this area.
Analysis and Judgement
  1. A leader who can easily assimilate and evaluate complex data or concepts. Someone who explores opportunities to solve problems and generally makes reasoned judgements. An individual who incorporates the skills and knowledge of others.
  2. A leader who can generally understand and analyse information but who can occasionally make rash or illogical decision particularly if under pressure. Someone who sometimes makes his/her mind up without consulting or thinking problems through.
  3. A leader who operates on a limited scope of ability with regard to grasping and making sense of information. Someone who is quick to make decisions without necessarily being able to see their consequences. A leader who is unlikely to use others to help build his/her own level of skill or knowledge.
  4. A leader who makes snap decisions not always based on rational understanding. Someone who is difficult to persuade and sees only his/her own viewpoint. A leader who rarely chooses to analyse and evaluate data and relies solely on 'gut feeling'.
Planning and Organising
  1. A leader who plans ahead, sticks to deadlines and always uses delegation. Someone who prioritises and routinely manages to achieve planned tasks within given deadlines.
  2. A leader who is good at planning and generally manages time well but who could on occasions make better use of his/her resources. Someone who occasionally lets lower priority activities take over.
  3. A leader who often finds it difficult to plan ahead, prioritise and delegate effectively. Someone who knows the theory but cannot implement planning activities as part of their routine tasks.
  4. A leader who is endlessly chasing deadlines, forgetting or simply ignoring activities in favour of dealing with the immediate workload. Someone who cannot prioritise and will find delegation very difficult
Innovation
  1. A leader who is able to see new ways of doing things and is prepared to formulate his/her ideas into action. Someone who is continually reviewing and updating existing systems and making suggestions for improvement.
  2. A leader who if prompted will assess and create alternative plans of action. Someone who is not necessarily original in his/her creativity, but who will appreciate and contribute new ideas.
  3. A leader who is not especially creative in his/her ability to see new opportunities or methods of operation. Someone who would rather stay with the traditional method even if that is unsatisfactory or rely on others to identify new approaches.
  4. A leader who is not able to objectively review methods of operation or create new ideas. Someone who would not make suggestions for improvements but who would follow a plan given to him/her without questioning its validity.
Adaptability and Resilience
  1. A leader who remains calm under pressure and reacts positively. Someone who is able to respond to change in a positive manner and is not worried by implementing new initiatives.
  2. A leader who is usually calm but can lose composure when placed in a difficult situation. Someone who is generally adaptable and not resistant to change but on occasions can find retaining a positive leadership style in the face of adversity difficult.
  3. A leader who is not very good at having to change or adapt. Someone who can be quite negative in the face of change and can detrimentally influence those around him/her.
  4. A leader who often reacts badly under pressure and loses the ability to manage others effectively. Someone who is very resistant to change and its implementation. An individual who does not recognise the need for a positive attitude to change.
Opportunity Awareness
  1. A leader who grasps opportunities which can impact on ministry success. Someone who recognises the need for and actively promotes YWAM products and services, and ensures that staff follow the example. A leader who effectively utilises his/her resources to maximise output without loss to any other activity.
  2. A leader who largely utilises opportunities and resources to the ministry advantage of the organisation. An individual who on occasion finds these activities difficult to fit in , and someone who will easily delegate responsibility. At times the focus of clear ministry goals is not obvious.
  3. A leader who is aware of ministry opportunity but perhaps only in a directed way and who does not always see every opportunity. Someone who completes tasks but does not always recognise their significance.
  4. A leader who fails to see the relevance of this ability to do his/her job. Someone who is not interested in activities which directly affect the success of the ministry. A leader who is not aware of his/her responsibilities to allocate and utilise financial resources effectively.
Staff Development
  1. A leader who plans and implements learning for staff. Someone who is not afraid to empower others through developing their skills and delegating. A leader who actively utilises opportunities to coach and train others.
  2. A leader who understands the need for development of new and existing staff and tries to fulfil his/her responsibilities. Someone who would, however, benefit from planning and executing staff development activities in a more structured way.
  3. A leader who trains and coaches as the need arises without much planning, who does not recognise development as a key part of his/her job. A leader who allows staff to learn by being thrown in the deep end with no follow through.
  4. A leader who spends little or no time with staff on coaching and development. A leader who blames others for not reaching the required standards and does little to aid or facilitate learning.
People Management
  1. A leader who is keen to praise, motivate and assist staff at all times, sets high standards of conduct, leads by example, clearly has the respect and admiration of his/her staff, is supportive to staff who show initiative and willingness to make their own decisions.
  2. A leader who tries to maintain positive management style but could improve. Someone who does not always praise, sometimes ignores good/bad work. A leader who most of the time has the respect of staff.
  3. A leader who achieves tasks through people but not as a matter of course use a positive style. Someone who is not setting and reinforcing high standards at all times. A leader who can be off hand with staff.
  4. A leader who is keen to avoid contact with staff or is over-familiar. Someone who only speaks to staff to reprimand when mistakes are made or ignore staff issues altogether. Someone who gains little respect and is not a positive role model for others.
Teamwork
  1. A leader who encourages staff to contribute to team effort and is able to integrate individuals with different skills and personalities into a team. Someone who is willing to listen and act on good ideas supplied by others. A leader who reacts positively within a team of managers.
  2. A leader who looks to build a strong team. Someone who allows others to contribute but who, on occasion, dominates or alternatively is ineffectual. A leader who generally joins in with a team of others on a similar level.
  3. A leader who communicates with individuals but does not use ideas and contributions collectively. Someone who finds it difficult always to appreciate the varying skills and personalities of those around him/her. A leader who is quiet and not forthcoming when placed in a team of peers, or is too argumentative or aggressive.
  4. A leader who finds it difficult to mould the team to achieve maximum effectiveness and work output. Individual members of staff irritate or intimidate this person, he/she would rather ignore them or would pass on difficult people to a senior leader. A leader who does not succeed in encouraging others.

(see PDF)

  • Self Confidence
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • People Management
  • Personal Effectiveness
  • Staff Development
  • Analysis & Judgement
  • Opportunity Awareness
  • Planning & Organising
  • Adaptability & Resilience
  • Innovation

Accountability Guide

The following are 10 key areas touching various facets of our walk with the Lord. Please consider prayerfully in which of these the Lord may want to prompt you for a closer look. Concentrate on two or three.

It is always conducive to growth to meet regularly with an accountability partner to share, pray and give mutual support.

  • The Word
    1. regular reading/meditation/prayer?
    2. new revelation?
    3. particular challenges?
    4. special personal promises?
    5. prompt obedience?
  • Prayer
    1. consistent habits?
    2. waiting on God?
    3. regularly interceding for others?
    4. experiencing encouraging answers to prayer?
    5. specific prayer needs? (e.g. pressure -- fear -- sickness -- finances -- family issues -- ministry concerns)
  • Thought Life
    1. insecurity?
    2. pride?
    3. envy?
    4. anger?
    5. unclean thoughts?
  • Vulnerability
    1. conscious of weakness?
    2. attacked by the enemy?
    3. tempted?
    4. convicted of sin?
    5. defeated or victorious?
  • Relationships
    1. family?
    2. deep friendships?
    3. improving social skills?
    4. damaged or broken relationships?
    5. closer relationships with non-Christians?
  • Dependency
    1. is Jesus the centre of my doing and being? (Do I go first to God, or people?)
    2. do I need the nurturing of others for personal security/identity?
    3. how do I cope with stress, anger, loneliness, disappointments, disillusionment, emotional pain, in regard to being placed emotionally 'upright' again?
  • Sexuality
    1. am I content in my married/unmarried state?
    2. am I satisfied that the Lord created me a man/woman?
    3. am I comfortable in the presence of the opposite sex?
    4. do I have judgements of those that are homosexual, judgements that cause an emotional response in me?
    5. am I engaged in any secret/unclean practise?
  • Community Life
    1. praying regularly for the base community?
    2. faithful attendance at base events?
    3. reaching out with compassion?
    4. recreational fellowship with others?
    5. things to be made right with anyone?
  • Stewardship
    1. responsible use of time?
    2. physically fit?
    3. sound private and ministry finances?
    4. sharpening of God-given gifts?
    5. fulfilling personal and family priorities?
  • Intellectual Development
    1. in need of intellectual stimulation?
    2. what reading material?
    3. learning beyond sphere of personal expertise?
    4. ollowing significant political, social, etc. developments?
    5. TV viewer/victim/addict?

Co-Worker Feedback Questions

Dear ______________

We are asking for your feedback on ___________. Often those who work alongside us have helpful insight to offer. Please comment on the following questions. Your input will complement his/her self-assessment and round off his/her interview with the line-leader.

Please return this form to _____________ by ______________.

  1. Circle eight words that describe your co-worker's relationship and style with regard to those he/she works with:
    • easily      provoked      assertive      kind      gracious      approachable
    • patient      demanding      preoccupied      persuasive      decisive      faithful
    • directive      critical      open      independent      just
    • supportive      self-controlled      relational
  2. Which godly character qualities do you see modeled that inspire you to grow?
    • ______________________________________________________
  3. In which ways does your colleague's spiritual life influence his/her work and leave a mark on those working alongside?
    • ______________________________________________________
  4. The following Core Leadership Competencies describe possible demonstrated behaviour. This grid enables you to note how you rate his/her competencies. There are four ratings available, a definition has been provided in each case. Read these carefully before deciding where you would see your co- worker. You may find him/her halfway in one and halfway in the other section, that's fine. Please mark points in the area of the grid (at the end of the document) that relates to his/her skill level. This creates an awareness of those areas where further growth is needed.

(see PDF)

  • Self Confidence
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • People Management
  • Personal Effectiveness
  • Staff Development
  • Analysis & Judgement
  • Opportunity Awareness
  • Planning & Organising
  • Adaptability & Resilience
  • Innovation
Self Confidence
  1. Someone who acts on his/her own initiative with respect for authority -- a leader who speaks confidently and assertively. Someone who willingly makes decisions and is accountable for his/her actions.
  2. A leader who can be confident in speech and manner but who can easily be knocked back by circumstances or by words and actions of others. Someone who has the capability but who sometimes finds it difficult to express confidence or give the expression of self-confidence to others.
  3. A leader who sometimes acts assertively but not always. Someone who needs reassurance with regard to decision making and problem solving. Someone who does not always turn ideas into action.
  4. A leader who does not seek opportunities for decision making and change and who would rather rely on dictated rules. Someone who does not speak positively and seems unsure of him/herself. A leader who rarely expresses an opinion or takes action without prompting.
Communication
  1. A leader who speaks and writes clearly, conveying meaning accurately to others. An individual who actively communicates at all levels and routinely takes time to discuss current issues with staff.
  2. A leader who believes communication is important and usually demonstrates this with all staff. An individual who can communicate clearly and concisely, verbally and in writing, but who on occasion does not recognise and act upon every opportunity.
  3. A leader who does not always remember to use positive words and phrases. An individual who only communicates with staff when told to or when a situation has become intolerable.
  4. A leader who does not think before communicating and consequently does it poorly. An individual who always assumes others have the same understanding. A leader who is not skilled in written or verbal communication.
Personal Effectiveness
  1. A leader who takes action, shows initiative, utilises time well and has energy and enthusiasm to complete tasks irrespective of difficulties experienced.
  2. A leader who tries hard to maintain high levels of personal productivity. An individual who demonstrates the use of his/her own initiative in work and the management of others. Someone who tries to maintain high levels of productivity but can be overwhelmed by seemingly impossible problems.
  3. A leader who finds it hard to see activities through to completion either through lack of drive and energy or the inability to overcome setbacks. Someone who relies on direction from the line leader.
  4. Someone who does not maintain high levels of personal productivity, who lacks initiative and does not always produce work of good quality. Someone who does not recognise his/her own problem in this area.
Analysis and Judgement
  1. A leader who can easily assimilate and evaluate complex data or concepts. Someone who explores opportunities to solve problems and generally makes reasoned judgements. An individual who incorporates the skills and knowledge of others.
  2. A leader who can generally understand and analyse information but who can occasionally make rash or illogical decision particularly if under pressure. Someone who sometimes makes his/her mind up without consulting or thinking problems through.
  3. A leader who operates on a limited scope of ability with regard to grasping and making sense of information. Someone who is quick to make decisions without necessarily being able to see their consequences. A leader who is unlikely to use others to help build his/her own level of skill or knowledge.
  4. A leader who makes snap decisions not always based on rational understanding. Someone who is difficult to persuade and sees only his/her own viewpoint. A leader who rarely chooses to analyse and evaluate data and relies solely on 'gut feeling'.
Planning and Organising
  1. A leader who plans ahead, sticks to deadlines and always uses delegation. Someone who prioritises and routinely manages to achieve planned tasks within given deadlines.
  2. A leader who is good at planning and generally manages time well but who could on occasions make better use of his/her resources. Someone who occasionally lets lower priority activities take over.
  3. A leader who often finds it difficult to plan ahead, prioritise and delegate effectively. Someone who knows the theory but cannot implement planning activities as part of their routine tasks.
  4. A leader who is endlessly chasing deadlines, forgetting or simply ignoring activities in favour of dealing with the immediate workload. Someone who cannot prioritise and will find delegation very difficult
Innovation
  1. A leader who is able to see new ways of doing things and is prepared to formulate his/her ideas into action. Someone who is continually reviewing and updating existing systems and making suggestions for improvement.
  2. A leader who if prompted will assess and create alternative plans of action. Someone who is not necessarily original in his/her creativity, but who will appreciate and contribute new ideas.
  3. A leader who is not especially creative in his/her ability to see new opportunities or methods of operation. Someone who would rather stay with the traditional method even if that is unsatisfactory or rely on others to identify new approaches.
  4. A leader who is not able to objectively review methods of operation or create new ideas. Someone who would not make suggestions for improvements but who would follow a plan given to him/her without questioning its validity.
Adaptability and Resilience
  1. A leader who remains calm under pressure and reacts positively. Someone who is able to respond to change in a positive manner and is not worried by implementing new initiatives.
  2. A leader who is usually calm but can lose composure when placed in a difficult situation. Someone who is generally adaptable and not resistant to change but on occasions can find retaining a positive leadership style in the face of adversity difficult.
  3. A leader who is not very good at having to change or adapt. Someone who can be quite negative in the face of change and can detrimentally influence those around him/her.
  4. A leader who often reacts badly under pressure and loses the ability to manage others effectively. Someone who is very resistant to change and its implementation. An individual who does not recognise the need for a positive attitude to change.
Opportunity Awareness
  1. A leader who grasps opportunities which can impact on ministry success. Someone who recognises the need for and actively promotes YWAM products and services, and ensures that staff follow the example. A leader who effectively utilises his/her resources to maximise output without loss to any other activity.
  2. A leader who largely utilises opportunities and resources to the ministry advantage of the organisation. An individual who on occasion finds these activities difficult to fit in , and someone who will easily delegate responsibility. At times the focus of clear ministry goals is not obvious.
  3. A leader who is aware of ministry opportunity but perhaps only in a directed way and who does not always see every opportunity. Someone who completes tasks but does not always recognise their significance.
  4. A leader who fails to see the relevance of this ability to do his/her job. Someone who is not interested in activities which directly affect the success of the ministry. A leader who is not aware of his/her responsibilities to allocate and utilise financial resources effectively.
Staff Development
  1. A leader who plans and implements learning for staff. Someone who is not afraid to empower others through developing their skills and delegating. A leader who actively utilises opportunities to coach and train others.
  2. A leader who understands the need for development of new and existing staff and tries to fulfil his/her responsibilities. Someone who would, however, benefit from planning and executing staff development activities in a more structured way.
  3. A leader who trains and coaches as the need arises without much planning, who does not recognise development as a key part of his/her job. A leader who allows staff to learn by being thrown in the deep end with no follow through.
  4. A leader who spends little or no time with staff on coaching and development. A leader who blames others for not reaching the required standards and does little to aid or facilitate learning.
People Management
  1. A leader who is keen to praise, motivate and assist staff at all times, sets high standards of conduct, leads by example, clearly has the respect and admiration of his/her staff, is supportive to staff who show initiative and willingness to make their own decisions.
  2. A leader who tries to maintain positive management style but could improve. Someone who does not always praise, sometimes ignores good/bad work. A leader who most of the time has the respect of staff.
  3. A leader who achieves tasks through people but not as a matter of course use a positive style. Someone who is not setting and reinforcing high standards at all times. A leader who can be off hand with staff.
  4. A leader who is keen to avoid contact with staff or is over-familiar. Someone who only speaks to staff to reprimand when mistakes are made or ignore staff issues altogether. Someone who gains little respect and is not a positive role model for others.
Teamwork
  1. A leader who encourages staff to contribute to team effort and is able to integrate individuals with different skills and personalities into a team. Someone who is willing to listen and act on good ideas supplied by others. A leader who reacts positively within a team of managers.
  2. A leader who looks to build a strong team. Someone who allows others to contribute but who, on occasion, dominates or alternatively is ineffectual. A leader who generally joins in with a team of others on a similar level.
  3. A leader who communicates with individuals but does not use ideas and contributions collectively. Someone who finds it difficult always to appreciate the varying skills and personalities of those around him/her. A leader who is quiet and not forthcoming when placed in a team of peers, or is too argumentative or aggressive.
  4. A leader who finds it difficult to mould the team to achieve maximum effectiveness and work output. Individual members of staff irritate or intimidate this person, he/she would rather ignore them or would pass on difficult people to a senior leader. A leader who does not succeed in encouraging others.

(see PDF)

  • Self Confidence
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • People Management
  • Personal Effectiveness
  • Staff Development
  • Analysis & Judgement
  • Opportunity Awareness
  • Planning & Organising
  • Adaptability & Resilience
  • Innovation

Reviewer Guidance Notes

Planning

The appraisal is an annual event which we will all benefit from. It will be conducted through the line structure from the top down; initiative and responsibility for implementation lie with leadership. Action Plan

  • Appraisal consists of three phases, please make sure that you allow sufficient time for each:
  1. self-assessment will take each individual 1-2 weeks
  2. the review/feedback meetings require
    • 1 hour with accountability partner (will be part of the diary anyway)
    • 1-2 hours with line leader for every individual
  3. The growth plan to be finished within a week after line leader interview
  • you arrange the meetings and hand out the appropriate paperwork (self assessment paper and growth plan, co-worker feedback) well in advance

Please make sure

  • that everyone involved understands purpose and sequence of the appraisal process
  • that you are thoroughly prepared with your own notes for the review/feedback meetings
  • that the actual meetings can run without interruptions

Review/Feedback Meetings

Some people are easily intimidated when faced with a formal review. Please try to put the person you meet at ease and stress that the focus of the appraisal is growth and development. As you review the past year together please be prepared to listen carefully and give specific feedback as well as invite comments from the other person. There is a suggested interview format for leaders enclosed with this package. Please record important points you discuss and conclusions you reach.

Ideally the Growth Plan could be completed at the end of the review meeting. If however, the person needs some more time to think about it, please allow for that. It is important that every YWAM staff member takes responsibility for his/her own development; growth goals should therefore be the result of someone's own insights, and with input from the leader (not imposed!).

Follow Up

Any notes taken during the meeting that refer to the individual should be handed to the person at the conclusion of the appraisal process. The only document kept on file will be the Growth Plan. It forms the basis of next year's review and should be referred to at mutually agreed intervals to ensure that the plan is working.

You pass the co-worker feedback forms to the individual after the feedback session.

N.B. It is important to keep every commitment you have made to your staff person for assistance and support throughout the year.

Organisational issues that may have come up during the meeting should be noted and taken up at the appropriate level.

The following questions are meant as a guide, not as prescription. Please feel free to phrase your own but make sure you touch all aspects of the self- assessment. Give the person you meet with ample opportunity for explanation and expression first, i.e. LISTEN. When you communicate your own observations make sure you invite feedback as well. A guiding principle should be encouragement. Please give careful thought before the interview as to which major strengths you see in the other person as well as affirming any growth you have already observed.

Spiritual Growth and Leadership

"Let's talk about your walk with God. How life-giving has it been for you? How satisfied are you with your times alone with Him, your knowledge and application of the Word?"

"Which areas of your personal spiritual life has the Lord emphasised and what growth goals have you set for yourself in that respect?"

"Let's talk about your spiritual leadership. Your self-assessment will have highlighted some aspects that you are doing well in and some that need attention. Please talk me through them."

"Here are some things I have observed concerning

  • confidence in hearing God for self and ministry and the ability to follow through appropriately
  • clear understanding of spiritual authority and boundaries
  • model of godly character qualities
  • awareness of pastoral condition of staff etc."

"In what ways have I been a godly example to you in my spiritual leadership?'

Vision and Ministry

Please share some of the things your are excited and encouraged about concerning your vision and its expression in ministry.

(The following are questions that have been considered. Please refer to them as appropriate)

  1. Do you have a clear understanding of your present role?
  2. How well do you think you fulfil the requirements of your current job?
  3. What are your main areas of gifting and how can you use them in your present role?
  4. In what ways are you growing/feeling challenged in your ministry?
  5. How do you see your ministry serve the wider body of YWAM England?
  6. How do you take responsibility for your ongoing development?
  7. What is your call/life goal? Have the past twelve months brought you closer to it? Highlight major stepping stones/stumbling blocks along the way.

Investing Your Life in Others

"Do you agree with Maxwell's statement that the highest calling of leadership lies in developing people? Let's discuss the outworking of this."

"Let's look at the areas the questionnaire mentions:

  • developing one or more individuals
  • overall staff development
  • leadership style
  • team life

Please share your perspective on those areas."

"Your co-workers have commented"

"My observations: Where would you like more support from me or others?"

"Have I in any way made it difficult for you to maximise your potential in these areas?"

"In what way could I improve on my investment into your development?"

Core Leadership Competencies

"You have rated your competencies using the given definitions in 11 categories. Hopefully is was a stimulating exercise for you. I am aware that evaluating yourself against a given definition can be restricting and does not always show the full picture. I have done the exercise from my point of view. In order to identify how I can help you increase your competence let's compare notes, take into consideration your co-workers' comments and discuss reasons for differing results."

[There are four ratings available for each competency -- a definition has been provided in each case. Read these carefully before making a judgement. Excellence in the competency is likely to be aligned with behaviours in section 1, with 2, 3 and 4 indicating a reducing scale of effectiveness in each area. Please highlight the appropriate sections on the grid (page 9) which will graphically illustrate where development is required. Half points are possible.]

Self Confidence
  1. Someone who acts on his/her own initiative with respect for authority -- a leader who speaks confidently and assertively. Someone who willingly makes decisions and is accountable for his/her actions.
  2. A leader who can be confident in speech and manner but who can easily be knocked back by circumstances or by words and actions of others. Someone who has the capability but who sometimes finds it difficult to express confidence or give the expression of self-confidence to others.
  3. A leader who sometimes acts assertively but not always. Someone who needs reassurance with regard to decision making and problem solving. Someone who does not always turn ideas into action.
  4. A leader who does not seek opportunities for decision making and change and who would rather rely on dictated rules. Someone who does not speak positively and seems unsure of him/herself. A leader who rarely expresses an opinion or takes action without prompting.
Communication
  1. A leader who speaks and writes clearly, conveying meaning accurately to others. An individual who actively communicates at all levels and routinely takes time to discuss current issues with staff.
  2. A leader who believes communication is important and usually demonstrates this with all staff. An individual who can communicate clearly and concisely, verbally and in writing, but who on occasion does not recognise and act upon every opportunity.
  3. A leader who does not always remember to use positive words and phrases. An individual who only communicates with staff when told to or when a situation has become intolerable.
  4. A leader who does not think before communicating and consequently does it poorly. An individual who always assumes others have the same understanding. A leader who is not skilled in written or verbal communication.
Personal Effectiveness
  1. A leader who takes action, shows initiative, utilises time well and has energy and enthusiasm to complete tasks irrespective of difficulties experienced.
  2. A leader who tries hard to maintain high levels of personal productivity. An individual who demonstrates the use of his/her own initiative in work and the management of others. Someone who tries to maintain high levels of productivity but can be overwhelmed by seemingly impossible problems.
  3. A leader who finds it hard to see activities through to completion either through lack of drive and energy or the inability to overcome setbacks. Someone who relies on direction from the line leader.
  4. Someone who does not maintain high levels of personal productivity, who lacks initiative and does not always produce work of good quality. Someone who does not recognise his/her own problem in this area.
Analysis and Judgement
  1. A leader who can easily assimilate and evaluate complex data or concepts. Someone who explores opportunities to solve problems and generally makes reasoned judgements. An individual who incorporates the skills and knowledge of others.
  2. A leader who can generally understand and analyse information but who can occasionally make rash or illogical decision particularly if under pressure. Someone who sometimes makes his/her mind up without consulting or thinking problems through.
  3. A leader who operates on a limited scope of ability with regard to grasping and making sense of information. Someone who is quick to make decisions without necessarily being able to see their consequences. A leader who is unlikely to use others to help build his/her own level of skill or knowledge.
  4. A leader who makes snap decisions not always based on rational understanding. Someone who is difficult to persuade and sees only his/her own viewpoint. A leader who rarely chooses to analyse and evaluate data and relies solely on 'gut feeling'.
Planning and Organising
  1. A leader who plans ahead, sticks to deadlines and always uses delegation. Someone who prioritises and routinely manages to achieve planned tasks within given deadlines.
  2. A leader who is good at planning and generally manages time well but who could on occasions make better use of his/her resources. Someone who occasionally lets lower priority activities take over.
  3. A leader who often finds it difficult to plan ahead, prioritise and delegate effectively. Someone who knows the theory but cannot implement planning activities as part of their routine tasks.
  4. A leader who is endlessly chasing deadlines, forgetting or simply ignoring activities in favour of dealing with the immediate workload. Someone who cannot prioritise and will find delegation very difficult
Innovation
  1. A leader who is able to see new ways of doing things and is prepared to formulate his/her ideas into action. Someone who is continually reviewing and updating existing systems and making suggestions for improvement.
  2. A leader who if prompted will assess and create alternative plans of action. Someone who is not necessarily original in his/her creativity, but who will appreciate and contribute new ideas.
  3. A leader who is not especially creative in his/her ability to see new opportunities or methods of operation. Someone who would rather stay with the traditional method even if that is unsatisfactory or rely on others to identify new approaches.
  4. A leader who is not able to objectively review methods of operation or create new ideas. Someone who would not make suggestions for improvements but who would follow a plan given to him/her without questioning its validity.
Adaptability and Resilience
  1. A leader who remains calm under pressure and reacts positively. Someone who is able to respond to change in a positive manner and is not worried by implementing new initiatives.
  2. A leader who is usually calm but can lose composure when placed in a difficult situation. Someone who is generally adaptable and not resistant to change but on occasions can find retaining a positive leadership style in the face of adversity difficult.
  3. A leader who is not very good at having to change or adapt. Someone who can be quite negative in the face of change and can detrimentally influence those around him/her.
  4. A leader who often reacts badly under pressure and loses the ability to manage others effectively. Someone who is very resistant to change and its implementation. An individual who does not recognise the need for a positive attitude to change.
Opportunity Awareness
  1. A leader who grasps opportunities which can impact on ministry success. Someone who recognises the need for and actively promotes YWAM products and services, and ensures that staff follow the example. A leader who effectively utilises his/her resources to maximise output without loss to any other activity.
  2. A leader who largely utilises opportunities and resources to the ministry advantage of the organisation. An individual who on occasion finds these activities difficult to fit in , and someone who will easily delegate responsibility. At times the focus of clear ministry goals is not obvious.
  3. A leader who is aware of ministry opportunity but perhaps only in a directed way and who does not always see every opportunity. Someone who completes tasks but does not always recognise their significance.
  4. A leader who fails to see the relevance of this ability to do his/her job. Someone who is not interested in activities which directly affect the success of the ministry. A leader who is not aware of his/her responsibilities to allocate and utilise financial resources effectively.
Staff Development
  1. A leader who plans and implements learning for staff. Someone who is not afraid to empower others through developing their skills and delegating. A leader who actively utilises opportunities to coach and train others.
  2. A leader who understands the need for development of new and existing staff and tries to fulfil his/her responsibilities. Someone who would, however, benefit from planning and executing staff development activities in a more structured way.
  3. A leader who trains and coaches as the need arises without much planning, who does not recognise development as a key part of his/her job. A leader who allows staff to learn by being thrown in the deep end with no follow through.
  4. A leader who spends little or no time with staff on coaching and development. A leader who blames others for not reaching the required standards and does little to aid or facilitate learning.
People Management
  1. A leader who is keen to praise, motivate and assist staff at all times, sets high standards of conduct, leads by example, clearly has the respect and admiration of his/her staff, is supportive to staff who show initiative and willingness to make their own decisions.
  2. A leader who tries to maintain positive management style but could improve. Someone who does not always praise, sometimes ignores good/bad work. A leader who most of the time has the respect of staff.
  3. A leader who achieves tasks through people but not as a matter of course use a positive style. Someone who is not setting and reinforcing high standards at all times. A leader who can be off hand with staff.
  4. A leader who is keen to avoid contact with staff or is over-familiar. Someone who only speaks to staff to reprimand when mistakes are made or ignore staff issues altogether. Someone who gains little respect and is not a positive role model for others.
Teamwork
  1. A leader who encourages staff to contribute to team effort and is able to integrate individuals with different skills and personalities into a team. Someone who is willing to listen and act on good ideas supplied by others. A leader who reacts positively within a team of managers.
  2. A leader who looks to build a strong team. Someone who allows others to contribute but who, on occasion, dominates or alternatively is ineffectual. A leader who generally joins in with a team of others on a similar level.
  3. A leader who communicates with individuals but does not use ideas and contributions collectively. Someone who finds it difficult always to appreciate the varying skills and personalities of those around him/her. A leader who is quiet and not forthcoming when placed in a team of peers, or is too argumentative or aggressive.
  4. A leader who finds it difficult to mould the team to achieve maximum effectiveness and work output. Individual members of staff irritate or intimidate this person, he/she would rather ignore them or would pass on difficult people to a senior leader. A leader who does not succeed in encouraging others.

(see PDF)

  • Self Confidence
  • Teamwork
  • Communication
  • People Management
  • Personal Effectiveness
  • Staff Development
  • Analysis & Judgement
  • Opportunity Awareness
  • Planning & Organising
  • Adaptability & Resilience
  • Innovation


"How do you plan to make improvements? How can I assist you most effectively?"

"Are there any other concerns you would like to share? Any aspects of my leadership that you find difficult? Helpful?"

"Your co-worker have given feedback as well." [highlight praise and areas of concern]

"Please take a few days to consider your Growth Plan. It will be the one document that we both keep as an agreed guide for the coming year which we can refer to regularly when evaluating progress. We'll finalise it on..." (within 10 days of meeting)

Date:

Leadership Personal and Ministry Growth Plan

Personal and Ministry Growth Plan

(To be completed within 8 days of meeting with line leader.)

Consider for yourself

  • Which areas of my personal spiritual growth is the Lord emphasising?
  • What is the balance between my different roles? How can I set goals for growth across the spectrum?
  • Who can I turn to for input in areas that concern spiritual leadership and investment in people?
  • How can I staff my weaknesses in management more effectively to bring balance?

Set 2 to 3 goals in each area. Goals you formulate for the coming year should be SMART:

Specific (what) -- not general or vague but clear and precise
Measurable (how much) -- there needs to be a measure applied for assessment
Attainable -- a stretch but not totally out of reach
Relevant -- important to you so that you will give it time and effort
Time oriented -- by when you want to see this happen

Spiritual Growth and Leadership

Prioritised Goal Target Date Action Steps

Investing Your Life in Others

Prioritised Goal Target Date Action Steps

Core Leadership Competencies

Prioritised Goal Target Date Action Steps

Training and Development

Required to reach goals in coming year.

Planned areas for Training and Development Method Resources Required Target Date
(coaching, self development, formal learning, courses etc.) (funding, time, and Development, personal support, materials etc.)





Signed by you: __________________ Date: __________


Signed by line leader: __________________ Date: __________

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